Winter Solstice at Stonehenge

Druids, pagans and revelers have gathered at Stonehenge in England for the Winter Solstice. The large crowd congregated at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year ­- an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year.
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Druid Merlin poses for a photograph as druids, pagans and revellers gather, hoping to see the sun rise as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Getty Images)
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Druids, pagans and revellers gather in the centre of Stonehenge, hoping to see the sun rise, as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Getty Images)
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People dance as a man dressed in a rag costume plays an accordion, as druids, pagans and revellers gather, hoping to see the sun rise as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Getty Images)
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Rollo Maughfling, Archdruid of Stonehenge & Britain, (centre) conducts a ceremony as druids, pagans and revellers gather, hoping to see the sun rise as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Getty Images)
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A woman hugs the stones as druids, pagans and revellers gather, hoping to see the sun rise as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Getty Images)
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Rollo Maughfling, Archdruid of Stonehenge & Britain, (L) blesses baby Jim, held by his father Dan Lobb and watched by mum Kirsty Lobb (R) as druids, pagans and revellers gather, hoping to see the sun rise as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Getty Images)
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A man wearing a pagan mask poses for a photograph as druids, pagans and revellers gather in the centre of Stonehenge, hoping to see the sun rise, as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Getty Images)
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Druids, pagans and revellers gather in the centre of Stonehenge, hoping to see the sun rise, as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Getty Images)
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Druids, pagans and revellers gather in the centre of Stonehenge, hoping to see the sun rise, as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Getty Images)
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A woman wearing a unicorn mask watches as druids, pagans and revellers gather, hoping to see the sun rise as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Getty Images)
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Druids, pagans and revellers gather in the centre of Stonehenge, hoping to see the sun rise, as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Getty Images)
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People touch a stone inside Stonehenge as druids, pagans and revellers gather in the centre of Stonehenge, hoping to see the sun rise, as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Getty Images)